Digital Bill of Rights

A Digital Bill of Rights would be important, but this is not the way to do it. There is a lot of loose language here and that’s room to wiggle. Room to wiggle for a lawmaker is a means to introduce legislation that isn’t so good. Especially when it comes to an elected official that has a history of only voting his party. Shows that he’s not interested in voting what his constituents want, but is more interested in touting the party line and nothing else.

  1. Freedom – Digital Citizens have a right to a free, uncensored Internet, from anywhere, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation.
  2. Openness – Digital Citizens have a right to an open, unobstructed Internet, from anywhere, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation.
  3. Equality – All Digital Citizens are created equal on the Internet, thus laws of the physical and digital realms shall be applied equally, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation.
  4. Participation – Any and all Digital Citizens have a right to peaceably participate where and how they choose on the Internet, so long as their digital presence does not hinder services of the provider in any form.
  5. Creativity – Digital Citizens have a right to create, grow and collaborate on the Internet with whomever they choose, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation, and be held accountable for what they create.
  6. Sharing – Digital Citizens have a right to freely share their ideas, lawful discoveries and opinions on the Internet, where they choose and by which medium they choose, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation.
  7. Accessibility – Digital Citizens have a right to access the Internet, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation, or where they are.
  8. Association – Digital Citizens have a right to freely associate on the Internet, with whomever they choose, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation.
  9. Privacy – Digital Citizens have a right to privacy on the Internet, without exception to race, color, creed, religion, origin or orientation. All digital information held online (herein “The Cloud”) shall be held in the strictest of privacy and any disclosure by a private/public entity to a Government Agency or individual citizen shall also trigger full disclosure to the citizen who’s information is being shared.
  10. Property – Digital Citizens have a right to benefit from what they create, and be secure in their intellectual property on the internet.

Source: Republican Congress Representative Darrell Issa, [1], [2] (Original Source (here) does not work any more).